ADMAT Publishes its Interim Maritime Archaeological Report on

The Button Wreck in The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

ADMAT’s Button Wreck Team

ADMAT’s Button Wreck Team

 The non-profit organisation the Anglo~Danish Maritime Archaeological Team (ADMAT) and it’s American Charity ADMAT USA are delighted to issue the following press release:

The interim archaeological report on The Button Wreck has been released to the general public and is published on ADMAT’s Web site www.admat.org.uk, as well as over 500 photographs from the field school. It is believed this ship was an English frigate which was carrying troops when she ran aground probably in 1760’s. From the investigated amidships section, this ship could be between 90-150 ft long. ADMAT’s report “is one of the most professional archaeological report that has yet been issued on FKNMS archaeological resources” stated one NOAA archaeologist.

During the summer of 2005 ADMAT in conjunction with NOAA and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) operating under a NOAA permit, conducted a maritime archaeological survey of a wreck 2 miles south of Carysfort light tower, 5 miles from Key Largo in the Florida Keys. The wreck is called The Button Wreck. The site was found over 30 years ago by Jimmy Longendyke and was called The Button Wreck after military uniform buttons were found on the site. The late Maj. Denis Trelewicz who died in 2005 after the survey was undertaken, and the SRI volunteer team conducted research on this ship which ADMAT then followed up after the survey.

ADMAT Team members, Frank Betts and Jessica Berry working on   The Button Wreck

ADMAT Team members, Frank Betts and Jessica Berry working on The Button Wreck

Dr. Spooner from ADMAT stated this is a very important wreck site, situated under 3 metres of water in a seagrass area with interspersed hard bottom. The ship construction is very impressive which nearly the entire lower hull remaining intact. The team investigated the rear amidships section in the three weeks field school and within the shipscape found enough evidence to tie this with the Bunn Cannon Patch. It is currently believed that the Bunn Cannon Wreck Site is in fact the initial point of grounding and The Button Wreck was lightened by jettison the cannons and anchors enabling her to move south by a mile before getting permanently stuck, having the rudder ripped off in the process. Further research on the Bunn Cannon Patch and the bow section of The Button Wreck are required, and ADMAT hopes to return to this site to undertake this work.

ADMAT is planning to conduct field schools in the Keys again in 2008.

The ADMAT Team flying the Royal Automobile Club Flag on the wreck site

The ADMAT Team flying the Royal Automobile Club Flag on the wreck site

To go to the photographs and report click on this link: www.admat.org.uk/k2a.htm

End of Press Release